Turtle Protection

We need your help!

There are eight species of turtle in Ontario, and all of them are at risk.

That's partially because it takes 8 to 25 years before they reach reproductive age, only to have under 2% of their eggs hatch and survive to adulthood.

Why do so few survive?

In the spring, female turtles often nest on the gravelled shoulders of roads -- where they and their eggs encounter vehicle collisions and predators like raccoons, skunks and foxes. 

 

Over $95,000 Raised to Date

 

With your help, we've installed: 

  • turtle nest covers to protect eggs
  • wildlife tunnels for safe passageway
  • roadside fencing to prevent turtles and hatchlings from wandering onto roadways

To ensure it's working, we have started researching and tracking their survival rates. 

Our work has only begun. Support our continued efforts. 

 

Shop the Turtle Protection Collection

Proceeds directly support protection, research, and education in Ontario Provincial Parks.

Where Can You See Your Impact?

Kawartha Highlands Signature Site Park staff holds out a piece of fencing used to create turtle nest protections.

Kawartha Highlands Signature Site Provincial Park

Placed chain-link-fence-style turtle next covers throughout the park. Five Snapping Turtles and one Blanding's Turtle have been identified and protected here so far.

All five Snapping Turtle nests hatched within the first two weeks of September 2021, with an average of 24 eggs per nest.

Amazingly, 119 of the 121 eggs have hatched altogether. That's more than a 98% hatching rate!

Considering unprotected nests are destroyed by predators at rates of 59-94%, this is an indisputed success!

Presqu'ile Provincial Park

Expanded two existing turtle nesting mounds and created two more sites in locations where turtles previously showed interest.

After the turtles nested, the biodiversity team placed protected covers over the eggs. Throughout 2021, they delivered more than 100 hatchlings safely to the shore -- more than ever before!

Two Presqu'ile Provincial Park staff spread gravel at turtle nesting mounds.
Turtle laying eggs in a hole it dug along the Pakeshkag Trail at Grundy Lake Provincial Park

Grundy Lake Provincial Park

Converted a road into the new Pakeshkag Lake Trail to protect a significant nesting areas and installed signage to bring awareness to the species found in the park.

In 2021, the road was turned into a trail. In 2022, nine turtle nests were covered to protect the dozens of hatchlings, which would have previously been destroyed by cars and then predated.

Shop the Turtle Protection Collection

Proceeds directly support protection, research, and education in Ontario Provincial Parks.